2021 Redistricting Information

This page is designed to provide information to citizens concerning the redrawing of election district boundaries, a process known as Redistricting. Redistricting will effect the boundaries of the five Appomattox County Board of Supervisor/School Board districts.

What is Redistricting?

Redistricting is the process in which the physical boundaries of a voting district are changed.  Redistricting is required after each U.S. Census in order to keep the population fairly equal across each voting district within the state or locality. This insures the continuation of the "one man, one vote" principle central to our representative form of government.

Redistricting is a challenging activity due to laws, policies, and court rulings that govern the process, particularly which issues must be taken into consideration when developing new election district boundaries.  In addition to population equality, the following issues must be considered:

  • Racial fairness
  • Compactness of districts;
  • Contiguity of districts;
  • Avoidance of split political subdivisions and precincts;
  • Preservation of communities of interest;
  • Preservation of the basic shape of existing districts;
  • Protection of incumbents and avoidance of the pairing of incumbents;
  • Political fairness or competitiveness;
  • Voter convenience and effective administration of elections; and
  • Avoidance of split Census blocks.

County Redistricting Information

The Appomattox County Board of Supervisors has appointed a Redistricting Committee composed of:

  • William Hogan, Board of Supervisors
  • Alfred Jones, Board of Supervisors 
  • Tom Adams, Citizen Representative 
  • Tom Hall, Citizen Representative
  • Lonnis Selz, Citizen Representative

The Committee has been assisted by:

  • Susan Adams, County Administrator
  • Patricia Morton, General Registrar
  • Tom Lacheney, County Attorney
  • Johnnie Roark, Director of Community Development

The Committee has worked to develop a Leading Alternative Plan (PDF) which was presented to the Board of Supervisors at it's January 18, 2022 meeting. 

This plan is an evolution of the current election district boundaries. The starting point in the process was the County's new 2020 Census population (16,119), which was divided by the number of election districts in the County (5) to find the “ideal” population (3,224) for each district.  This ideal population was then compared to the actual 2020 population for each district.  The district boundaries were then adjusted to to bring all five districts to within 5% (+ or -) of the “ideal” population.

A formal public hearing for the Leading Alternative Plan (PDF) has been scheduled for Tuesday, February 22,2022 at 7:00 pm. After adoption, staff will submit a pre-clearance packet to the Attorney Generals office per Virginia Code. 

Appomattox County is in the midst of the once-a-decade process of redrawing election district boundaries.  This process is known as “Redistricting”, and is required by law to keep the County’s five Board of Supervisors and School Board districts more or less equal in terms of population.  This insures the continuation of the “one man, one vote” principle central to our representative democracy.

On the surface, the redistricting process seems pretty easy.  After each Census, the County’s new total population figure (16,119 in 2020) is divided by the number of election districts (5) to find the “ideal” population (3,224 in 2020) for each district.  This ideal population is then compared to the actual 2020 population for each district.  However, the challenge is to adjust district boundaries to bring all five districts to within 5% (+ or -) of the “ideal” population for each district.

The reason this is such a challenging activity is that by law and/or court rulings, the County’s Redistricting Committee must take into consideration the following issues along with population equality and racial fairness when redistricting:

  • Compactness of districts;
  • Contiguity of districts;
  • Avoidance of split political subdivisions and precincts;
  • Preservation of communities of interest;
  • Preservation of the basic shape of existing districts;
  • Protection of incumbents and avoidance of the pairing of incumbents;
  • Political fairness or competitiveness;
  • Voter convenience and effective administration of elections; and
  • Avoidance of split Census blocks.  (A criterion not found in the law, but one that is generally followed.)

The changes will be mostly evolutionary in nature, with only minor adjustments made as necessary to even out the districts in terms of population. 

 You will find the Leading Alternative Map, the Demographic Report for 2021, and the proposed ordinance for your review in the following related documents.

Related Documents